Saturday, 22 December 2012

Apocalypse never

As we seem to have survived yesterday's 'scare', perhaps it's time to settle down with a glass of red wine and a chess problem or two.   Over each of the next few days there will be a problem for you to solve.  Don't give in and use your computer; try and solve them yourself (not that your computer will help you with this one...).

Here's the first.   Solutions will be provided later.

White to play in mate in 2.


6 comments:

  1. Hi Bob,

    Now you have given me a headache.

    No mate in two here unless black co-operates however mate in 3 is child's play.

    Analysis

    Help mates first

    1f7 Kg7
    2f8(Q) is mate

    1 any pawn move Kxh5
    2Rxh7is mate

    However none of these replies is forced

    1f7 g4!
    2f8 promoting to anything Q, B, R or N) Kxh5
    is not mate in two

    1f7 g4
    2f8(Q) Kxh5
    3Rxh7 mate is 3 moves not two

    Ok so let us check out all the legal King moves
    1 Kg4 is stalemate
    1 Ke4 Kxh5 or 1 Ke6 Kxh5 and there is no mate
    this move.

    The Rook has eight possible moves
    1 Rook to anywhere on the eight rank Kxh5 and there is no mate
    1 Rxh7 Kh7 and there is no mate

    The h5 pawn has no moves
    1 f7 g4 2Kxg4 is stalemate
    1 e6 g4 2Kxg4 is stalemate

    Any other king move is not mate
    Any other Rook move is not mate
    Any other pawn move is not mate

    So unless black decides to be suicidal there is no forced mate in two.

    Best wishes

    David Green

    ReplyDelete
  2. David
    This is a real game so think along those lines rather than as a puzzle, there is a mate in two.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Dave - A bit of retro-analysis may come in handy. It's White to play, so what was Black's last move?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well done Gino! If anyone is still confused, Black's last move must've been g7-g5, which means that White can take en passant hxg6.

    ReplyDelete

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